Tag: service

the Way of Jesus: a litany

L:           Jesus came to Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God.

P1:        Saying, “The time is fulfilled.”
P2:       “The kingdom of God has come near.”

L:           Listen to his words.

P1:       Seek first the kingdom of God.
P2:       The kingdom of God is all around you.
P1:       The kingdom of God is right there in your presence.
P2:       Pray: Your kingdom come on earth as it is in heaven.

L:          The kingdom of God is a vision of a community committed to a distinctive way of life.

P1:       The first followers of Jesus became known as the “followers of the Way.”
P2:       As they listened to his teachings, they put them into practice.

L:           Following Jesus means practicing radical love.

P1:       Love God with all your heart, mind, and strength.
P2:       Love your neighbor as yourself.
P1:       Treat others as you would have them treat you.
P2:       Love your enemies and do good to those who hate you.

L:           Following Jesus means practicing lavish generosity.

P1:       Give to everyone who begs from you.
P2:       Do not refuse anyone who wants to borrow from you.
P1:       Lend, expecting nothing in return.
P2:       Sell your possessions, and give money to the poor.

L:           Following Jesus means practicing extravagant forgiveness.

P1:       Forgive and you will be forgiven.
P2:       Pray for those who mistreat you.
P1:       Bless those who curse you.
P2:       Forgive seventy times seven times.

L:           Following Jesus means practicing inclusive hospitality.

P1:       He welcomed the rejected and outcasts.
P2:       He touched and healed the unclean and diseased.
P1:       He shared meals with the despised and marginalized.
P2:       He blessed the destitute, the hungry, and the weeping.

L:           Following Jesus means practicing compassionate action.

P1:       Jesus was moved with compassion to heal the sick.
P2:       Jesus was moved with compassion to feed the hungry crowds.
P1:       The Samaritan was moved by compassion for the man by the side of road.
P2:       The father was moved by compassion for his prodigal son.
P1:       Be compassionate as God is compassionate.
P2:       Blessed are the compassionate, for they shall receive compassion.

L:           Following Jesus means practicing selfless service.

P1:       Feed the hungry.
P2:       Give drink to the thirsty.
P1:       Clothe the naked.
P2:       Care for the sick.
P1:       Visit the imprisoned.
P2:       Welcome the stranger and immigrant.
P1:       The greatest among you will be your servant.

L:           Following Jesus means practicing a passion for justice.

P1:       Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for justice.
P2:       Blessed are those who are persecuted for the sake of justice.
P1:       Bring good news to the poor and oppressed.
P2:       Strive first for God’s justice.

L:           Following Jesus means practicing creative nonviolence.

P1:       If anyone hits you on your right cheek, offer him your left cheek too.
P2:       If anyone forces you to go one mile, then go two miles.
P1:       If anyone takes your coat, give him the shirt off your back too.
P2:       If anyone takes away your goods, do not ask for them again.
P1:       Do not return evil for evil.
P2:       Blessed are those that work for peace.

L:           Following Jesus means practicing simple living.

P1:       One’s life does not consist in the abundance of possessions.
P2:       Do not worry about what you will eat.
P1:       Do not worry about what you will drink.
P2:       Do not worry about what you will wear.

L:           Jesus taught a way of costly commitment which led to the cross.

P1:       Empower us to respond to the call of Jesus.
P2:       To give up self-centered ambition.
P1:       To take up our crosses.
P2:       And to follow Jesus.

 

compassion in action: charity, service, and justice

Compassion is a feeling of empathy with the suffering of others, the capacity to feel how others feel. The Latin root of the word compassion is a compound of com (with) and passio (suffer), which gives us the meaning to suffer with. Compassion is entering into the pain of another. It is feeling the suffering of someone else—experiencing it, sharing it, tasting it. It is identifying with the sufferer, being in solidarity with the sufferer.

True compassion is being so moved at a gut level that we are moved to the point of action. Jesus was moved by compassion for the poor. We are told that, “He had compassion on them because they were harassed and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd” (Matthew 9:36) And in the parable of the Good Samaritan he demonstrated that the one who loves the neighbor is the one who shows compassion on the one who suffers, even if that person is culturally defined as the enemy.

Marcus Borg (1942–2015) has said that, “For Jesus, compassion was the central quality of God and the central moral quality of a life centered in God.” The Pharisees represented a theology of holiness, according to Borg, which was based on holiness as a defining characteristic of God: “Be holy for I, Yahweh, am holy.” (Leviticus 11:44) Jesus proclaimed a theology of compassion based on an alternative characterization of God’s essence: “Be compassionate as your Father in heaven is compassionate.” (Luke 6:36) These differing theologies led them to different ways of living.

compassionate action

Compassionate action usually takes three forms: charity, service, and justice. Although some would include service under the first category, charity more specifically involves gifts of money, clothing, food, or other material goods, but does not necessarily involve an investment of our time and talents. Charity is important, but writing a check to a worthy does not really change us in a fundamental way. Although charitable giving demonstrates a generous nature, we often remain distant from those we seek to help. Service, however, involves us face-to-face with those in need. It can be an immensely transformative experience that can change us from our natural state of self-centeredness into increasingly selfless people. Perhaps it is the only thing that will. Although generosity sometimes leads to self-satisfaction, service often becomes a very humbling experience.

Charity and service are both personal forms of compassionate action. Their objective is to alleviate the effects of suffering in the world. Justice, on the other hand, seeks to eliminate the root causes of suffering. Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929–1968) said:

We are called to play the Good Samaritan on life’s roadside; but that will be only an initial act. One day the whole Jericho road must be transformed so that men and women will not be beaten and robbed as they make their journey through life. True compassion is more than flinging a coin to a beggar; it understands that an edifice that produces beggars needs restructuring.

Justice is focused on transforming the social structures and systems that produce poverty and suffering. Justice is the social form of compassionate action. It is the political means of caring for the least of these. The difference between charity and service on the one hand and justice on the other is this: charity and service seek to heal wounds, while justice seeks to end the social structures that create wounded people in the first place. William Sloane Coffin (1924–2006) has said: “The bible is less concerned with alleviating the effects of injustice, than in eliminating the causes of it.” Still, all three of these are necessary components of what German martyr and theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer (1906–1945) described as righteous action in the world. Together, righteous action and contemplative prayer would form the essence of a  “religionless Christianity” in our day.

Our being Christian today will be limited to two things: prayer and righteous action among [humanity]. All Christian thinking, speaking, and organizing must be born anew out of this prayer and action.

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